CSforGood Competition

Celebrating and recognizing the unbridled imagination of primary and secondary students across the state, the Nextech CSforGood Fall Competition challenges K-12 Hoosier students to innovate, create and build positive change in their schools and local communities.

Working with a teacher sponsor, teams of 3-6 students across three divisions: elementary (K-5), middle (6-8) and high (9-12) school, will submit a technology project – either a software application, website, physical computing device or prototype (digital or paper) – that they created to demonstrate how computer science can be used for good when applied to real problems that affect their schools and communities.

The top four teams from each division will be invited to the Nextech CSforGood Celebration on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 at the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis, which is during Computer Science Education Week. The finalists will showcase their projects, along with how they honed their problem solving, teamwork and CS skills, to a panel of judges, legislators, policy leaders, influencers and the tech community. One winning team per division will be announced at the end of the event. Each winning team member will be awarded a $200 gift card and teacher sponsors will receive $1,000 to go towards tech for their classrooms.

All projects are due on November 1, 2023 and the top teams will be announced on or by November 8, 2023. Student teams can get started on their projects as soon as they would like. If you need help getting started, view the competition details.

Nextech CSforGood Logo

Celebrating and recognizing the unbridled imagination of primary and secondary students across the state, the Nextech CSforGood Fall Competition challenges K-12 Hoosier students to innovate, create and build positive change in their schools and local communities.

Working with a teacher sponsor, teams of 3-6 students across three divisions: elementary (K-5), middle (6-8) and high (9-12) school, will submit a technology project – either a software application, website, physical computing device or prototype (digital or paper) – that they created to demonstrate how computer science can be used for good when applied to real problems that affect their schools and communities.

The top four teams from each division will be invited to the Nextech CSforGood Celebration on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 at the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis, which is during Computer Science Education Week. The finalists will showcase their projects, along with how they honed their problem solving, teamwork and CS skills, to a panel of judges, legislators, policy leaders, influencers and the tech community. One winning team per division will be announced at the end of the event. Each winning team member will be awarded a $200 gift card and teacher sponsors will receive $1,000 to go towards tech for their classrooms.

All projects are due on November 1, 2023 and the top teams will be announced on or by November 8, 2023. Student teams can get started on their projects as soon as they would like. If you need help getting started, view the competition details.

Submissions are closed for the
2023 CSforGood Challenge.

Registration is closed for the
2023 CSforGood Challenge.

2022 Winners

Elementary School (tie)

Clarks Creek Elementary School

Solution Name: Clarks Creek SafePass (CCSP)
Student Description: CCSP is an app for parents of car riders, giving parents the ability to check in once they have arrived to the dismissal line and thereby alerting teachers to release a particular student.

Lakeview Elementary School

Solution Name: Friendship Finder
Student Description: The Friendship Finder app is all about bringing kids together and a super cool way for kids to make new friends. The app includes videos on making new friends; games to help students to connect to others and a quiz to match kids with similar interests.

Middle School

South Vermillion Middle School

Solution Name: Carp Detector
Student Description: People, Fish, and Animals depend on rivers as a food source. In the 1970s, aquaculture lake owners in Arkansas brought in Asian carp to control algae. This was an effective solution until the 1990s when major flooding caused the Asian carp to escape into the Mississippi River. Because the Mississippi River feeds so many smaller rivers in surrounding states, the Asian carp have spread and are threatening river ecosystems.

High School

Castle High School

Solution Name: Logit
Student Description: Logit is a website that streamlines curriculum adaptation and documentation by providing a means to track lessons completed in the classroom. Logit improves transparency in the classroom for teachers, parents, admins, and students.

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